Can shock wave therapy help foot problems?

Shock wave therapy is a treatment system which was first introduced into clinical practice back in 1980 as a strategy to breaking up renal stones. Ever since then it has currently commonly been utilized as a technique for musculoskeletal issues and to induce the development of bone. Shock waves are high strength soundwaves generated under water using a high current blast. For orthopedic problems they are utilised to generate fresh blood vessel formation and also to activate the release of growth factors like eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase), VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) along with PCNA (proliferating cell antinuclear antigen). Afterwards this can lead to the development of the blood circulation and also to a rise in cell growth which will help healing. A recent episode of the podiatry livestream, PodChatLive was spent dealing with shock wave treatment for podiatrists.

In this occurrence of PodChatLive the hosts spoke with the expert Physio, academic and researcher Dylan Morrissey about how exactly good the data base for shock wave treatments are and how solid the methods that is typically utilized within such investigation. He also discussed what foot as well as ankle disorders shockwave is usually indicated to treat and regularly used for and if there are any important advisable limitations or pitfalls regarding shockwave’s use. Dr Dylan Morrissey is a physiotherapist with over 25 years’ experience of employed in sports and exercise medicine. Dylan finished a MSc at University College London in the UK in 1998 and then a PhD in 2005 at King’s College London, United Kingdom. He is currently an NIHR/HEE consultant physio and clinical reader in sports medicine and MSK physiotherapy at Bart’s and the London NHS trust / BL School of Medicine and Dentistry, QMUL. Dylan has accomplished more than £5m in research backing and has authored in excess of 60 peer-reviewed full publications. His most important research interests are shockwave and tendon issues, science translation as well as the link between motion and symptoms.